Boris Johnson latest: PM hits out at ‘condescending’ critics of Rwanda plan

Boris Johnson doesn’t deny offering Carrie Symonds top job

Boris Johnson has said criticism of the Home Office’s plan to send asylum seekers to Rwanda is “condescending”.

The Prime Minister, speaking from the Rwandan capital Kigali, said he was ready to highlight the “obvious merits” of the asylum policy to the Prince of Wales during their upcoming talks.

Prince Charles reportedly called the Rwandan plan “appalling” in remarks he made privately.

But the No 10 later said Mr Johnson was unlikely to bring up the subject with the royal when they met at the center of the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (Chogm) leaders’ summit in Kigali.

This will follow Mr Johnson’s talks with Rwandan President Paul Kagame, during which he did not raise human rights concerns about his regime.

The government in Kigali said it had already received payments under the £120million economic and migration deal signed with the UK Home Office two months ago, and that he had already spent some of the money.

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Watch: PM could call snap general election, says Cable

Sir Vince Cable has predicted Boris Johnson will make the ‘high risk’ decision to call a snap general election.

Former Lib Dem leader Vince Cable predicts October general election

The former Lib Dems leader said the Prime Minister had a “player’s” mindset and could call an election in the autumn to “avoid an even worse situation” for his government.

Sir Vince said a number of factors were working against the Tory government, such as the “dreadful” economic outlook which is “worsening and getting worse”.

Lamiat SabinJune 23, 2022 7:30 p.m.

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MEPs call Rwandan plan ‘unethical’ and ‘racist’

Parliamentarians across Europe have denounced Boris Johnson’s plans to deport asylum seekers to Rwanda as “unethical” and “racist”.

The comments were made during a debate at the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe.

Delegates expressed concern over the Tory-led government’s apparent willingness to break international law and pass a UK Bill of Rights that would allow UK judges to overturn decisions of the European Court of Human Rights. man.

Read the full story here by Andre Bécasse and Ashley Cowburn

Lamiat SabinJune 23, 2022 7:00 p.m.

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“Labour can get a better deal on EU protocol” – Lammy

Labor’s experience in negotiating the Good Friday Agreement means it will be able to secure a better solution to the dispute over the Northern Ireland Protocol, David Lammy has said.

The shadow Foreign Secretary told an event on Wednesday organized by UK think tank In A Changing Europe that a Labor government would be better received in Brussels.

Shadow Foreign Secretary David Lammy

(Aaron Chown/PA)

He said: “The EU must be less rigid. But the EU partners frankly told me that if there was a partner they could trust, they could show more flexibility.

“Instead they have Boris Johnson lying, breaking the law and never delivering on his promises.

“With a change of prime minister and a change of government, the UK could build a stable and mutually beneficial relationship with the EU over the long term.”

Speaking on the sixth anniversary of the Brexit referendum, Mr Lammy reiterated Labour’s position that it would not seek to rejoin the EU or re-enter the customs union or single market.

But, he said, the party would seek “practical solutions to reduce controls to an absolute minimum” by pursuing an agreement on food and agricultural standards, sharing trade data and using a risk” for goods entering Northern Ireland from Great Britain.

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PM calls critics of Rwandan plan ‘condescending’

Boris Johnson has said criticism of the Home Office’s plan to send asylum seekers to Rwanda is “condescending”.

The Prime Minister, speaking from the Rwandan capital Kigali, said he was ready to highlight the “obvious merits” of the asylum policy to the Prince of Wales during their upcoming talks.

Prince Charles reportedly called the Rwandan plan “appalling” in remarks he made privately.

Prince Charles and Boris Johnson at the opening of a police memorial last year

(AP)

But the No 10 later said Mr Johnson was unlikely to bring up the subject with the royal when they met at the center of the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (Chogm) leaders’ summit in Kigali.

This will follow Mr Johnson’s talks with Rwandan President Paul Kagame, during which he did not raise human rights concerns about his regime.

The government in Kigali said it had already received payments under the £120million economic and migration deal signed with the UK Home Office two months ago, and that he had already spent some of the money.

Lamiat SabinJune 23, 2022 6:01 p.m.

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Starmer to miss Big Meeting at Durham Miners gala

Labor leader Sir Keir Starmer is set to miss a trip next month to the Durham Miners’ Gala – which is a key event on the socialist calendar.

The traditional union-backed event, known as the Big Meeting, draws some 200,000 people to the historic city center, where crowds watch parades of marching bands and banners.

The gala was canceled in 2020 and 2021 due to Covid, and its return is dedicated to the key workers who have kept society alive during the pandemic – a move organizers announced last year.

Bands and banners in the traditional Durham Miners gala

(Owen Humphreys/PA)

Sir Keir, who is facing the so-called ‘beergate’ police inquiry into his trip to Durham in April 2021, is not among the speakers at the gala.

A decision on whether he should receive a fixed penalty notice for drinking a bottle of beer in MP Mary Foy’s office is due in the coming weeks.

Both Jeremy Corbyn and Ed Miliband attended the Durham Miners Gala when they were party leaders, watching the processions from a hotel balcony before speaking to large crowds gathered at the racecourse.

Before Mr Miliband went to the gala in 2012, the last Labor leader to attend was Neil Kinnock in the 1980s.

It has already been described as the largest remaining labor demonstration in the country.

Lamiat SabinJune 23, 2022 5:32 p.m.

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Collapsing Tory support threatens ‘Celtic Tory fringe’ in the South West, poll finds

A collapse in Conservative support in the South West of England could see the party lose 11 seats in a general election – and be a hair’s breadth from losing Jacob Rees-Mogg’s constituency.

YouGov found that the Conservatives’ vote share in seats they have dubbed the “Celtic Tory Fringe” has fallen 19 points since the 2019 general election, leaving Boris Johnson’s party at 38% in the region.

The figures were released on the day of a by-election in the Devon seat of Tiverton & Honiton, where the Liberal Democrats are hoping to overthrow a massive Tory majority in an area that has been ‘true blue’ since 1923.

Eleanor SlyJune 23, 2022 5:10 p.m.

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ICYMI: How much longer can Boris Johnson ignore the Brexit-shaped elephant in the room?

The Resolution Foundation’s latest pay study looks to the future – but it’s clear the prime minister’s high-wage, high-skilled economy has so far failed to materialize, writes Ben Chapman

Read Ben’s full article below:

Matt MatherJune 23, 2022 4:40 p.m.

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One-off tax could hurt investment in the North Sea

The windfall tax could hurt investment in the North Sea, Chancellor Rishi Sunak has said.

The Chancellor unveiled the measure in May to impose a 25% surcharge on the profits of oil and gas giants.

Energy companies have warned it could hurt the sector despite hopes the policy will bring in up to £5billion.

At a meeting in Aberdeen on Thursday, Offshore Energy UK chief executive Deirdre Michie said she had pressed Mr Sunak on the matter.

“The energy profit tax is an unexpected new tax that changes the basis for investment,” she said.

“We had a candid and constructive meeting with the Chancellor to discuss these issues and our industry leaders were clear about their concerns, particularly the impact on investor confidence. Both parties have pledged to continue discussions.

“We will work constructively with the UK government and do our best to mitigate the damage this tax will cause, but if energy companies reduce their investment in UK waters they will produce less oil and gas.

“That means they’ll end up paying less tax and have less money to invest in low-carbon energy.”

Eleanor SlyJune 23, 2022 4:07 p.m.

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ICYMI: Conservatives risk losing more than two by-elections

For the Conservative Party to lose a by-election would be unfortunate – losing two would be a sign that it risks losing its electoral base, writes Professor John Curtice.

Read his full analysis here:

Matt MatherJune 23, 2022 3:40 p.m.

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Collapsing Tory support threatens ‘Celtic Tory fringe’ in the South West, poll finds

A collapse in Conservative support in the South West of England could see the party lose 11 seats in a general election – and be a hair’s breadth from losing Jacob Rees-Mogg’s constituency.

YouGov found that the Conservatives’ vote share in seats they have dubbed the “Celtic Tory Fringe” has fallen 19 points since the 2019 general election, leaving Boris Johnson’s party at 38% in the region.

Our political editor Andre Bécasse reports:

Matt MatherJune 23, 2022 3:22 p.m.

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